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How to use Centauri Data Logging

With Centauri’s latest firmware, you can log up to 2 GB of data onboard, as well as up to 32 GB on a USB flash drive....
01/01/20

OEM Ethernet Solutions

Ophir has the widest selection of OEM laser measurement solutions, with practically any permutation of sensor, interface, and feature set you could imagine. ...
11/28/19

Measuring irradiance of non-collimated light

In some applications laser or LED light is illuminating a certain area. In those applications it may be more practical to measure the irradiance or power density in [W/cm2] rather than...
11/28/19

New Innovations for Integrating Spheres

Integrating spheres have been around for decades, many decades. They are the go to solution for measuring divergent light sources. After such a long history, what could be new in integrating...
11/28/19

Tech Tip: Frequency Measurement

When measuring pulsed beams with the NanoScan, it is important to input the correct pulse rate into the software. Often this is not the value that the laser manufacturer reports or that the user...
11/28/19

When not to get upset by an offset?

When working close to the maximum power rating of a thermal sensor, have you ever noticed the display reading going to negative values between measurements?  What is the possible meaning of...
11/28/19

Fighting Viruses

UV-C LED - will all the research soon pay off?The world remains in a continuing state of uncertainty due to the new COVID-19 coronavirus. Face masks and disinfectants are...
03/23/20

Calibration of Ophir Terahertz Sensors

Terahertz (THz) applications - till recently mainly still in the R&D phase - are beginning to emerge into the light of the commercial and...
11/18/19

FluxGage 604

The Ophir FluxGage 604 TM compact measurement system for LED luminaires delivers x and y color coordinates, CCT and illuminance within seconds. FluxGage is Everything To Get Your Light Right.
05/17/20

Camera Based Laser Beam Profiling with BeamGage

Camera based laser beam profiling allows real time viewing and measuring of a beams spatial uniformity. This video explains why BeamGage is the worlds most advanced beam profiling platform and how...
03/22/20

BeamWatch AM

BeamWatch AM is an integrated laser measurement system designed to measure critical laser beam parameters for laser-based additive manufacturing systems.
03/22/20

Pyrocam Measures IR and UV Lasers

This video explains why the Spiricon Pyrocam pyroelectric camera is the overwhelming camera of choice for laser beam diagnostics of IR and UV lasers and high temperature thermal imaging for...
03/22/20

BeamSquared Auto ISO

This video describes the BeamSquared software Auto ISO measurement feature, which makes obtaining an ISO compliant beam measurement as easy as "align and click."
03/22/20

Fiber Optic Adapters for Ophir Sensors

Need to measure a laser beam coming out of a fiber? To do it right, the fiber will need to be suitably positioned in front of the sensor, and held steady. ...
01/12/20

LBS 300 HP NIR

The LBS-300HP-NIR beam splitter allows camera-based beam...
10/30/19

Integrating Spheres: Overview

If your application requires measurement of a widely diverging beam, an integrating sphere might be the right solution. ...
06/02/19

Medical Applications

Laser measurement has widely spread in the treatment of patients as well as in the manufacturing of medical products and instrumentation. This video explains how Ophir laser measurement technology...
05/27/19

Pulse Characterization Sensors

Using these Ophir fast photodetectors, you can see and measure the temporal characteristics of pulsed and CW laser beams.
05/01/19

Ophir solution for LED measurement

LEDs are becoming the light source of choice in many industrial, medical, and scientific applications. Correct measurement - of the right parameter - is not trivial, but is often critical to the...
04/16/19

Ophir solution for IPL measurement

Measurement of light in IPL applications presents some unique challenges; Ophir offers solutions specifically designed to meet them.
04/16/19
05/06/20

NanoScan 2 has an Automation Interface built into it that works with ActiveX. The manual for how to use this interface can be found under the \Program Files (x86)\Photon\NanoScan v2\Documentation location on the computer where you have installed the NanoScan software. Unfortunately, if your NanoScan was purchased as a Standard model, you will need to purchase an upgrade from Standard to Professional so this function can be unlocked.

05/06/20

The Video Trigger monitors the digitized camera sensor area and acquires new frames whenever a pixel from the camera sensor exceeds the preset trigger level. If the camera is free running with Video Trigger enabled, then there is one or more pixels in the acquired camera sensor area that exceeds the trigger level. You may be able to increase the trigger level to prevent free running, which is selectable from 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 of the camera dynamic range. It may be necessary to reduce the camera Exposure setting or Gain setting if it is set higher than 0.0db. If none of these suggestions work, then the camera may have bad pixels that are mis-performing with artificially higher responsivity, and the camera will need to be returned to have its bad pixel map updated to exclude the mis-performing pixels.

05/03/20

Regular laser safety precautions should apply. Please note, that the main incident beam will exit the LBS-300HP refracted approximately 6°. Provision must be made to safely contain the transmitted beam by beam dump or power meter.

05/03/20

Generally, continues usage of LBS-300HP is limited only by temperature increase, thus in case the temperature is mild, there is no limitation.

According to tests, after 10 minutes at 2kW lasing the temperature is increased by 16 Cº and after 4kW lasing increased by 23.4 Cº.

It's not recommended to overheat the LBS-300HP assembly in order not to cause thermal lensing effect of ND filters.

05/03/20

Due to such significant attenuation, some light scattered from wedges might interfere correct beam profile measurement and cause offset. Thus, in case the setup allows it we recommend distancing the CCD from wedges by 50, 75 or 100mm C-mount extension tube between LBS-300HP and beam profiler.

05/03/20

Generally, any beam dump can be used. We recommend using Ophir Beam Dumps with high absorbance at 1070nm and locate it at least 10cm from LBS-300HP to avoid scattered light reaching beam profiler CCD.

05/03/20

The beam blocker is designated to keep one wedge surface protected during handling and shipping. It can be left attached for low power laser operations. However, in the case of high-power laser irradiation scattered light might interfere with beam profile measurement and cause offset. In case of such offset, we recommend removing the beam blocker.

After removal, an additional laser output, having less than 0.1% of incident beam power will be reflected. That beam could be used for simultaneous measurement of laser power via Ophir Power Meter in addition to beam profiler.

05/03/20

In case of surface contamination, we recommend contactless cleaning of wedge surface by rinsing it with a chemically pure solvent such as Ethanol, Methanol or IPA (Isopropyl Alcohol), followed by prolonged gentle nitrogen or pure compressed air purging.

Please ensure solvent and gas purity and lack of moisture in order not to contaminate the wedge surface.

If contamination is not removed after cleaning, please consider whether it interferes your laser beam. The spot might be peripheral and not in CA of the laser.

In case the spot is in the laser CA, please contact Ophir support for replacement.

05/03/20

Any contact with UVFS wedges installed in the LBS-300HP assembly can cause damage and reflection change resulting in beam profile distortion. Thus, it's recommended to avoid even the slightest contact with glass surface with neither hand , paper or cloth.

Operating and storing of LBS-300HP at conditions free of volatile particles, like a regular office or laboratory environment. Harsh industrial environment operations will require isolation.

05/03/20

We recommend operating and storing the LBS-300HP in dust-free conditions, like a regular office or laboratory environment.
Dust and other volatile particles on the wedge surface might cause reflection change and influence the measured beam profile.
Harsh industrial environment operations will require a chamber for isolation.

05/03/20

Yes, the main function of LBS-300HP-NIR beam splitter is Beam profiling, however it performs a 3-way beam splitting:

Less than 0.0001% (1/10⁶) of the beam is reflected in one direction and less than 0.1 % in another while remaining 99.9% of incident laser beam is transmitted.

This allows user to measure one of the 3 beams, depends on available power measurement equipment and setup convenience.

05/03/20

A specification defines beam attenuation of a million, meaning less than 0.0001% (1/10) of the beam is reflected towards beam profiler or power meter, however, this parameter can vary from unit to unit. In the majority of units the reflection even less than 0.0001%. The median reflection is 0.000075% and can vary by +/-20% (relative). The exact reflection from each surface is measured during the final production QC and documented in COC supplied with the unit. You can also verify the real reflection of your unit with Ophir support team

05/03/20

The LBS-300HP-NIR uses specially treated material that provides extremely low reflection and high laser damage threshold, enabling beam attenuation by around a million times while keeping all beam parameters. This extreme attenuation enables measuring High Power laser beam profile focused on a beam profiler CCD.

05/03/20

The LBS-300HP-NIR is designated for NIR (~1070nm) lasers operating from 500W up to 5KW or up to 50MW/mm².
 
Other wavelengths are also possible to be measured; however the specifications might change because all trials were conducted using 1050-1070 nm lasers.

03/12/20

Customers often measure the same laser with 2 different Ophir sensors, both of which are specified to be within calibration. Let’s say that both of the sensors are specified to have a calibration uncertainty of ±3%. Do I expect the difference in reading between them to be less than 3%? On the first thought, this is what one might expect. However this is not necessarily so.
 
First of all, when we specify a calibration accuracy of ±3%, we are talking about a 2 sigma uncertainty, i.e. the readings of various sensors will be within a bell curve with 95% of all sensors reading within 3% of absolute correct calibration and 5% reading outside this accuracy. Thus there is a small chance that the meter will not be reading within 3% of absolute accuracy.
 
A more important reason is that the two sensors’ calibration error may be in two different directions and thus show a larger discrepancy between them than 3%. Say one sensor has been calibrated and reads 2.5% above absolute calibration and the other 2.5% lower than absolute calibration. Both of the sensors are within the specified ±3% absolute calibration but they will still read 5% differently from each other.
 
If we do statistical analysis, the analysis will show that there is in fact a probability of >16% that two correctly calibrated sensors will differ in reading from each other by more than 3% and a probability of over 6% that the sensors will differ in reading between each other by more than 4%.

02/26/20

Although these sensors measure average power (of both CW and repetitively pulsed beams), not pulse energy, it is possible for a pulsed beam to have average power within the sensor’s rated limits and yet have the energy of the pulses themselves be high enough to cause a momentary saturation of the sensor. It is important to be sure that pulse energy is also within sensor spec – not just the average power. This is explained in detail in this White Paper.

02/26/20

The answer to this is, of course, it depends. It depends on the pulse frequency and it depends on which sensor you want to use. Thermopile detectors do not have very fast response times, so frequencies above 100Hz are effectively the same as CW to them and all BeamTrack functions will perform as expected. Below 100 Hz the response time of the detectors becomes relevant. Low power sensors generally have faster response times so they will be more susceptible to fluctuating readings when used with a pulsed laser. The position measurement function uses the same thermopile detector as the power reading. If the laser frequency is high enough for the sensor to provide a stable power reading without fluctuations then the position measurement function will perform well too. All of our BeamTrack sensors will provide reliable position measurements for pulse frequencies down to below 10 Hz. The beam size function employs a detector that has a faster response time. At low frequencies the size measurement reading will fluctuate. We don't recommend relying on the size reading for laser pulse frequencies below 100 Hz. In any event, you can always try the sensor with your laser. If the readings are stable, without significant fluctuations, then they will be reliable.

01/20/20

BeamSquared has an Automation Interface built into it that works with .NET 4.6. The HTML based manual for how to use this interface can be found under the Programs\Spiricon Documentation\BeamSquared Automation Interface location on the computer that you have installed the software. We are continually improving this interface, so to get the latest version of the BeamSquared software visit our web site and download the latest version.
https://www.ophiropt.com/laser--measurement/software-download

01/20/20

A camera's maximum framerate is listed in its specification. The ability to capture frames (up to the maximum framerate) is the effective framerate, or Frame Rate. BeamGage indicates the Frame Rate towards the bottom right of the application on the Status Bar, like this: 

You may find that the Frame Rate is lower than you expected.

One of the first things to consider is your hardware. Frame Rate is highly dependent on PC processor and graphics adapter performance. We do not provide recommendations for PC specifications required for a given level of performance as this is highly variable and not possible for us to predict, control, or guarantee.

Here is some technical guidance which may improve some acquisition scenarios:

Ensure you are using a dedicated USB 3.0 host controller for USB 3.0 cameras.

Check your exposure time setting. A longer exposure time can dramatically slow down your Frame Rate. For CW sources, set your exposure time to the shortest possible for your application. For Pulsed sources, set the exposure time to best synchronize with your pulse. Here is an example of a long exposure time, this setting may only get you about a 5Hz Frame Rate:

(1000ms / 181ms = 5.52Hz)

When maximum framerate is required then we recommend the following settings:

  • Enable Frame Priority mode
  • Disable all displays, calculations, and other features to reduce all possible processing load
  • Data can be replayed at a custom frame rate via the File Console source to post-process the data with all desired calculations, displays, and features.

 

When real time analysis of the camera frames is required then we recommend the following settings:

  • Enable Results Priority mode
  • Enable displays, calculations, and features as required.
  • Each frame of data will be acquired as quickly as possible after acquisition, image processing, results calculations, and display updates of the previous frame is complete.

 

01/20/20

These sensors (e.g. 3A, 10A, 12A) are sensitive enough that even small air currents near the sensor can be picked up by them, and can result in some slow thermal drift in the reading. The “tube” (or “snout” as we sometimes call it) prevents this problem, or at least minimizes it, by reducing the degree to which air flow in the room becomes air flow near the sensor’s absorber surface, and also it limits the sensor’s solid angle “field of view”.

11/13/19

If the setup and the water cooling are all stable (of course, that should be checked), there is no reason - as far as the sensor is concerned - that the reading should show significant fluctuations. A simple way to diagnose this: Try placing a photodiode in front of the sensor and facing towards it. It will sample a bit of the back-reflected power from the sensor; looking at the photodiode’s output signal will tell you if the fluctuations are real or not.

10/28/19

For laser powers up to 1500W use the L1500W-LP2-50 (P/N: 7Z02772) sensor or the L1500W-BB-50 (P/N: 7Z02752) sensor.
For laser powers up to 5000W use the 5000W-LP2-50 (a) (P/N: 7Z02773) sensor or the 5000W-BB-50 (P/N: 7Z02754) sensor.
Note: (a) Please note that older versions of the above sensors do not have the requisite 4 threads on Ø70mm circle on their front flange and cannot be used with the QBH adapter

10/28/19

In order to measure the fiber laser power we need to assure on one hand that the beam size on the absorber is not to small so as to exceed the power density requirements of the absorber and on the other hand that the beam size is not so large that it does not fit into the aperture. This necessitates two lengths of fiber adapter, the QBH-L & QBH-S
The QBH-L (P/N:7Z08348) is suited for beams with divergence angles of up to 120 mrad (for 86% of the beam), the minimum divergence angle depends on total power and the graph in the datasheet should be consulted for exact values.
The QBH-S (P/N:7Z08349) is suited for beams with divergence angles of up to 180 mrad (for 86% of the beam), the minimum divergence angle depends on total power and the graph in the datasheet should be consulted for exact values.
For more information please contact Ophir’s representatives.

09/26/19

When medical, aerospace, or other complex devices are produced in an Additive Manufacturing, powder-bed laser system, the product design requires the use of a variety of power levels. These different setting are a function of the structural integrity of the device under build, but also the efficiency of the design to avoid the use of excess materials, powders, and processing time. In a typical 1kw Additive Manufacturing laser, power levels during the build can range from 400W to 1000W, for either short or long durations. Therefore, profiling the laser beam at these different power levels is required. In a recent application test, a 1kW laser was provided at a variety of power settings from 400W to 1kW, in increments of 200Ws. The result of this diagnostic test demonstrated that as the power was increased, the ellipiticity (roundness) of the beam deteriorated. The change was not significant but demonstrated that in any build requiring a 360 degree range of the laser, the focal spot would be slightly larger in one direction and slightly smaller in a different direction, resulting in a major defect of the build. And since some of these builds can take 10’s of hours, finding out after the build that the laser is not round to specification is a costly result. These beam profiling diagnostics alerted the client to a potential problem BEFORE they went to build product, avoiding costly mistakes.

09/26/19

The Ophir PyroCam IV is the camera of choice for Terahertz applications with an absorption range from 1um to 3000um. The key to these applications, however, is the average power. Most Terahertz applications are very low power, mW’s or much less, although the requirements of the Ophir PyroCam IV are such that they typically require a few mW’s for effective measurement and imaging. In this application with such low power, using the Ophir BeamGage Pro software with its usual setting was not sufficient for the requirement. A standard control feature, however, in BeamGage Pro, is Frame Summing, located under the Capture Tap on the Control Ribbon. This feature allows for multiple frames to be stacked on top of each other to build up the signal to a point of measurement and visual graphics. In one application, the Terahertz power was so low that summing 40 frames was required to achieve satisfactory results. But, without this feature, the client would not have been able to profile their beam and thereby understanding the beam size, shape, and intensity.

09/26/19

There are likely two options, depending on the wavelength of the laser. The best approach is to use an image plane where the beam is projected onto the transparent plane and the Ophir Beam Profiler camera with focusing lens images the beam on this plane. This approach works well for UV applications and most wavelengths up to 1.0um. In the range of 1550nm, the best approach for profiling large beams involves projecting the beam onto a white board, functioning as the image plane, and then using the Ophir SP1203 InGaAs camera and lens, imaging the beam off the white board. The size of beam is limited the focusing lens and the intensity of the imaged beam. In either case this approach is does not require extensive fixturing or costs.

09/26/19

They are related, but not exactly the same. “Raw” is one of two options for setting the Analog Output. Basically, the Analog Output can be set by the user in 2 ways:

  • The source of the Analog Output is the processed (Digital) reading, in which case the Analog Output voltage represents the calibrated laser power (this is what is normally meant by “Analog Output”);
  • The source of the Analog Output is the unprocessed sensor input (Raw). In this case, the analog output voltage is a continuous non-digitized output. It is derived directly from the amplified sensor input signal, with little conditioning. The ‘Raw’ analog output option can be useful for analyzing the temporal shape of fast laser pulses.
06/17/19

The big difference between StarLab 3.40 and 3.31 is the enhanced support for our new Centauri dual channel meter. (Go download it free now and you'll see what I mean.) There are two other major improvements that I should mention:

  • Added Low freq Power (Aka VCSEL) support for: Centauri, StarBright, Juno, Juno + and EA-1
  • Added Power from Pulse support for Centauri, StarBright, Juno and Juno +

Find out more (and download StarLab) on the product page.

05/27/19

Currently we provide no support or examples for the BeamGage Automation Interface using Python because Python does not fully support .NET interfaces and misses two critical features: .NET Remoting and Casting. Any programming language that supports those features for .NET Framework 4.5 or later, should work OK, but this typically is limited to compiled languages. As such, we do not have Python examples available.
 
While Python does not natively support .NET, IronPython (http://www.ironpython.net) , or Python for .NET (http://pythonnet.sourceforge.net/) are integrations for the language that may work, but may require separate implementation of wrapper libraries of the provided BeamGage Automation Interface to handle the casting and remoting functionality.

05/22/19

We need to differentiate between logging to StarLab and logging on board a meter.

  • Logging to StarLab:
    For functions set on the meter, StarLab logs just the power itself (not the function results). Our guiding principle when StarLab is communicating with our meters is to transmit to the PC the Power measurement as is, without applying functions set locally on the meter.
    For functions set in StarLab, two columns of measurements are recorded in the StarLab log – the “raw” measurement and the measurement with the functions applied.
  • Logging onboard a meter:
    StarBright and Centauri log the results of any applied function or combination of functions. Older meters log just the power, not the results of functions that were applied.
05/22/19

In general, as the divergence angle of the beam entering the integrating sphere increases - and as its diameter increases – the assumptions on which we base the sphere’s performance (infinite reflections inside the sphere walls, perfectly uniform distribution of light inside the sphere, etc.) become less correct. We therefore specify the maximum beam divergence (such as ± 60⁰), and we also state the maximum possible change in reading caused by change in beam size. In fact, we also state in the data sheet that the maximum additional uncertainty due to beam size is only ±1% for beam divergence < 30⁰, and ±3% for beam divergence > 30⁰. To give this more meaning: Basically, if you measure the power using a beam that is a few mm in diameter, that has a relatively small divergence angle, and is centered on the sphere’s input port aperture, you can safely ignore this additional uncertainty.

05/15/19

60 Frames/second
The effective frame rates listed in BeamGage specification sheets are the maximum rates typically achievable in actual use.  Frame buffering, image processing techniques, graphical displays, and mathematical computation all add degrees of overhead to achieving higher frame rates.  This can be further limited by the available PC hardware.  BeamGage features two modes, Frame Priority and Results Priority, which change how the system balances the work.  Results Priority acquires a frame, performs any enabled image processing, performs all calculations and updates the graphical displays before accepting another frame from the camera.  This mode is most useful when a temporal sequence of frames is not necessary and should always be enabled when logging.  Frame Priority mode will allow the calculations and graphical display updates to be interrupted if another frame is ready from the camera before those operations are complete.  This can be useful when collecting all frames at the maximum camera frame rate is necessary.

05/15/19

60 Frames/second
The effective frame rates listed in BeamGage specification sheets are the maximum rates typically achievable in actual use.  Frame buffering, image processing techniques, graphical displays, and mathematical computation all add degrees of overhead to achieving higher frame rates.  This can be further limited by the available PC hardware.  BeamGage features two modes, Frame Priority and Results Priority, which change how the system balances the work.  Results Priority acquires a frame, performs any enabled image processing, performs all calculations and updates the graphical displays before accepting another frame from the camera.  This mode is most useful when a temporal sequence of frames is not necessary and should always be enabled when logging.  Frame Priority mode will allow the calculations and graphical display updates to be interrupted if another frame is ready from the camera before those operations are complete.  This can be useful when collecting all frames at the maximum camera frame rate is necessary.

04/11/19

The spectral range stated at the beginning of the spec indicates the range of wavelengths for which the sensor can be usefully used even if the exact calibration is not specified for that range. This means that over the calibrated wavelength range, the accuracy is specified and guaranteed. Over a wider useful wavelength range, the sensor is usable but no accuracy is guaranteed. In general over this wider range, the accuracy will be within up to ±15%.

03/31/19

ROI is “Region Of Interest”, there are 2 main reasons to use it, the first is if you like to select smaller region from the entire frame and by that to remove noise areas that can harm the measurement results. The second one is to give the ability of multiple beam analysis – up to 16 beams where separate results will be computed for each enabled ROI

03/26/19

The spectral range stated at the beginning of the spec indicates the range of wavelengths for which the sensor can be usefully used even if the exact calibration is not specified for that range. This means that over the calibrated wavelength range, the accuracy is specified and guaranteed. Over a wider useful wavelength range, the sensor is usable but no accuracy is guaranteed. In general over this wider range, the accuracy will be within up to ±15%.

03/06/19

The Pyrocam IIIHR and Pyrocam IV (upon first connection and initialization in BeamGage) startup in the “Pulsed” trigger method, which sets them to a state of waiting for an electronic trigger signal from a pulsed laser source before they will acquire data or start running. If you connect a repetitive pulsed trigger source with the trigger method set to “Pulsed” then the Pyrocam IIIHR or Pyrocam IV will start running; or if you switch the trigger method to “Chopped” (which is for steady state or CW lasers) then the internal optical chopper will begin to rotate and once it is synchronized, in ~15 seconds, then the Pyrocam IIIHR or Pyrocam IV will start running.

03/06/19

No. The cameras used with BeamGage are pre-setup specifically and licensed for BeamGage. There are configuration settings and mechanical differences with the BeamGage cameras, such as setting them to manual gain for linear response and removing the sensor’s protective glass cover in order to avoid fringe interference when used in BeamGage with laser light sources.

03/06/19

Ophir water cooled sensors measure the heat flow across the thermopile disc and therefore are quite insensitive to the water temperature or flow rate within the given specified limits. However, sudden changes in the water temperature or water flow rate can cause a disturbance to the reading until the flow rate/temperature stabilizes again. Therefore we specify in our water cooled sensors that the water temperature should not change faster than 1C/min. Likewise, sudden changes in flow rate (e.g. switching another device connected to the same water line on and off) can results in temporary disturbances in the power reading.

03/06/19

In general, as the divergence angle of the beam entering the integrating sphere increases - and as its diameter increases – the assumptions on which we base the sphere’s performance (infinite reflections inside the sphere walls, perfectly uniform distribution of light inside the sphere, etc.) become less correct. We therefore specify the maximum beam divergence (such as +\- 40 deg), and we also state the maximum possible change in reading caused by change in beam size. For the IS6 for example, we state in the data sheet that the maximum additional uncertainty due to beam size is only +/- 1% for beam divergence < 30 degrees, and +/- 3% for beam divergence > 30 degrees.
To put this in some practical terms: If you measure the power using a beam that is not much bigger than a few mm x a few mm, that has a relatively small divergence angle, and is centered on the sphere’s input port aperture, you can safely ignore this additional uncertainty.

03/05/19

The NanoScan V2 product is great for looking at focused spots, but sometimes the C-Mount ring that is on the front can get in the way mechanically. By removing the three retaining screws it will allow you to remove this ring so you can get mechanically closer to the front of the NanoScan V2. Care should be used when removing these screws and the ring so something does not fall down inside the input aperture of the NanoScan V2. It is recommended that if you are going to remove the C-Mount ring that you invert the NanoScan V2 so it is looking at the floor and then remove the screws and the C-Mount ring to allow gravity to work in your favor and pull them away from the input aperture.

03/05/19

This indicates that the NanoScan is a legacy NanoScan sensor which is programed only for the version 1 software, which is listed under legacy software as v1.47. If you do want to use the version 2 software, it is possible and it requires the purchase of the software license key as is described in the Notes on the software download web page below the Photon NanoScan v2 download links.

03/05/19

Error Code -22 is indicating Nominal baseline could not be determined. There are several causes for this, including detector failure, detector overheating with a high power laser, failure of the amplifier gain setting interface, and too much laser illumination incident in the aperture at program launch. If this error occurs, make sure the laser is blocked from entering the scan head aperture and try restarting the software. If the system was used for high power laser profiling, let the scan head cool down before restarting the software. If these attempts fail the unit likely needs to be returned.

03/05/19

This depends on the size of the beam, relative to either the slit width for "small" beams, or on the aperture diameter for "large" beams. Standard NanoScan apertures are either 3.5mm or 9mm, with 1.8µm, 5µm, 10µm, or 25µm slits. Standard Large Aperture (LA) NanoScan apertures are 12.5mm or 25mm, with 10µm or 25µm slits. (Please note that LA models are no longer available.)
 
The scanning slit introduces a systematic convolution error in measured spatial beam diameters that depends on the slit width "w" and the beam diameter "d". This error increases as the ratio of the slit width to the beam width increases. However, since the error is systematic it can be corrected, and this is discussed in detail in the NanoScan Manual Section 4.4.9 for TEM00 Gaussian beams.
 
The NanoScan accuracy specification for measurement of dslit diameter is 3% for all models of scan heads. As a rule-of-thumb, the convolution error only becomes significant for small beams when the 1/e2 beam diameter is of the order of 4 times the slit width, or d≤4w. For a Gaussian beam with d=4w the error is only approximately 3.7%.
 
The aperture diameter determines the largest beam that can be measured, and this depends on the shape of the beam, say Gaussian or Flat Top. A Flat Top beam can be almost the aperture size. To measure d4 it is necessary to acquire the full profile including the tail out to where the amplitude is <1digital count. For a Gaussian beam with 12-bit digitization, the beam is then limited to ~1/2.1 or ~0.476 × the aperture dimension. To be on the safe side a good rule-of-thumb here is to use a factor of 0.4, so the aperture is 2.5 × the 1/e2 beam diameter. However, if one wants to just measure a clip-level dslit diameter, it is only necessary to acquire the profile out to slightly less than the clip-level diameter. As examples, it is possible to measure a Gaussian beam with 8.9mm 1/e2 diameter using a 9mm aperture scan head. It is also possible to measure the FWHM diameter of a Gaussian beam with 15mm 1/e2 diameter.

03/05/19

The precision and accuracy of the 3.5mm and 9mm aperture systems is the same. It is the slit width that affects accuracy; with 3% for beam diameter (dslit) and <1um 3-sigma centroid accuracy. The slit width affects beam diameter due to convolution error. However, this error is on the order of <5% when the slit is only 4x the beam diameter. Thus, this only comes into play when the beam is ~20um for the 5um slit, 100um for the 25um slit, and 7.2um for the 1.8um slit. It is also possible to correct for convolution error. This is discussed in the manual for Gaussian beams. Generally it is not an issue with most users.

03/05/19

There are far fewer configurations of NanoScan head than there were BeamScan models, because some of the features that were hardwired into BeamScan models are software adjustable in the NanoScan. For example, some BeamScan models were wired to run at 5Hz, instead of 10Hz, and this feature was part of the model number. This is unnecessary in the NanoScan, because the scan rate is controllable from the application software. Another model that is no longer necessary is the LL, or low light version, since the increased dynamic range of the NanoScan handles low intensities without modification. Below is a chart of the best fits for replacing a BeamScan. One thing to note; all standard NanoScan models are 63.5mm diameter scan heads, so there is no direct replacement of the XYLA (50mm) models of BeamScan.

 

BeamScan Model NanoScan Model
XY NS2s-Si/3.5/1.8
XYGE NS2s-Ge/3.5/1.8
XYS NS2s-Si/9/5
XYGET NS2s-Ge/9/5
XYFIR NS2s-Pyro/9/5
XYQSW NS2s-Pyro/9/5
/PWR200 /P200
Other BeamScan designations All NanoScan 2s systems are USB
0180-XYxxx Old ISA Controller card
3088-1-XYxxx PCI Controller
3088-3-XYxxx PCMCIA Controller for laptop
2180-XYxxx DOS-Based computer controller
2197-XYxxx DOS-Based computer controller (replaced 2180)
BeamScan Meters No direct NanoScan replacement
1180-CP Standalone (non computer based) with single axis Si scan head (50mm diameter with 1.8um slits)
1180-GP Standalone controller with single axis Si scan head (63mm diameter with 5 and 25um slits)
1280-XY Standalone controller with dual axis Si scan head (50mm with 1.8um slits)
1280-XYL Standalone controller with dual axis Si scan head (63mm with 5um slits)
1280-XYFIR Standalone controller with dual axis pyroelectric scan head with 5um slits

 

03/05/19

Some users have reported an error message when attempting to install the latest versions of the NanoScan software:
 
Error 1330.A file that is required cannot be installed because the cabinet file C:\Users\Administrator\AppData\...\Data1.cab has an invalid digital signature. This may indicate that the cabinet file is corrupt.
 
This error is not caused by a corrupted file or anything in the NanoScan software. Windows systems that have not been updated recently, may fail to validate the digital certificates that are now used with our installers; specifically the missing updates are any that say Œroot certificates update¹ or similar. This is a common occurrence in laboratory environments as the PCs are often isolated from the internet and/or not updated often. Updating the computer to obtain the current VeriSign certificates will resolve the problem.

03/05/19

The NanoScan software version 1.47 for the USB interface works with Windows 7 64-Bit. NanoScan software version 2.X for the USB interface works with Windows 7 and Windows 10 64-bit.

03/05/19

The NanoScan is a PC application and intended to operate on the Windows operating systems. However, it might be possible to use the NanoScan with a Mac, provided that the Mac has installed the Parallels and Windows operating system available from your Apple dealer. The NanoScan might operate under the virtual Windows machine, but this operation and functionality is not supported.

03/05/19

The power meter available as a standard option on silicon and germanium detector NanoScan systems is a "relative" measurement, which means that the meter is not calibrated to an absolute standard in the factory. You need to measure the source with a calibrated power meter, and then input the value into the NanoScan software. The NanoScan will then measure relative to this measured value.

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