Category : Laser Power & Energy Sensors

Increase Production Quality and Efficiency by Measuring with Ophir’s Helios Laser Power Meter

Ophir’s Helios industrial laser power meter is a compact instrument for measuring high power lasers.
Designed with factory automation in mind,

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StarLab 3.30 screen capture feature – Simple, quick and ‘on the go’

Let’s say it’s just another working day at the office – you’re working with StarLab (Ophir Laser Measurement PC Software) and you just realized that the graph on the screen indicating the laser Power over the last few minutes needs to be saved because there was some unforeseen event and the Power changed, and you hadn’t had a chance set up and record this with the Logging feature.

Well, not to worry! We’re here for you.

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Wireless Laser Measurements: No Strings Attached

Remember how Pinocchio achieved his dream of becoming “real” when he was finally freed from his strings?

If you need to measure your laser beam’s power or energy, but the usual cable connection between the sensor and the meter is not practical, Ophir’s Quasar may be the right solution for you.

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StarLab 3.30 Pass/Fail limits feature – A closer look

User-defined pass/fail limits allow setting the upper and lower bounds of an acceptable measurement, and getting a clear indication when the measurement deviates from these bounds.

In case you weren’t aware -The ‘pass/fail’ feature can be used as a tool to perform QA final inspection on the laser. Developers can use this to demonstrate the results of a prototype laser to Management (or even VC’s!) as part of the pitch for funding.

How?

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Laser measurement software from Ophir® can now measure laser power from anywhere! – Part 2

If you read our last blog post in the series, now you probably wondering – ‘How can I connect my EA-1 (Ophir’s Ethernet adopter) to StarLab laser measurement software?’
Well, not to worry – we’ve got that covered for you:

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Laser measurement software from Ophir® can now measure laser power from anywhere! – Part 1

We’ve recently talked about 5 great benefits to using Wi-Fi while measuring your laser. It included reasons that had to do with industrial automation environments, avoiding cables and remote laser monitoring.

Now Ophir Sensors can also be monitored remotely over an Ethernet network – the same type of network connection you probably have in your office, allowing connections from distances far in excess of those supported by RS232 or USB.

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Product Focus: Using Ophir’S BC20 to Evaluate Scanned Effects in Light Show Applications

Music concerts, along with other entertainment venues such as nightclubs and theme parks, use laser sources to create colorful and vivid lighting effects.

Even with advances in non-coherent lighting, technology has not been able to replicate the unique appearance of laser lighting effects.

The types of lasers used for light show applications typically emit radiant powers in excess of 20W over a range of common wavelengths based on the technology employed in the projection device. Devices emitting such powers place them firmly into Class 4 laser product territory. How do laser officers deal with the challenge and what does Ophir have to offer? Coming up…

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How to choose the right sensor using the Ophir® Sensor Finder

Choosing the best laser sensor for a particular application can be quite overwhelming.
Ophir has so many sensors! Which is the best one for measuring your laser beam?
The choice actually depends on many parameters. The Ophir Sensor Finder does most of the thinking for you, and helps you choose the right sensor for your application. This video shows you how to use it:

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Technical Tip: How to select a power and energy meter – part 2

So, as we’ve started discussing the best way to pick a power meter last week, we’ve reached the third piece of data we need – and that is the laser wavelength. Why is it so important? In order to match it to the sensor absorber characteristics.

We need to select a sensor whose wavelength is within the measurement range of the sensor, power rating is equal to or higher than the maximum power we will measure, whose aperture is larger than the laser beam diameter so that it will contain the whole beam, and whose damage threshold is higher than the maximum expected laser power density at the given wavelength. The sensor absorber should be selected so it matches the wavelength for higher absorption.

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Technical Tip: How to select a power and energy meter – Part 1

Measuring optical power and energy depends on an understanding of the types of sensors and instruments available, and on requirements such as wavelength response, dynamic range, damage threshold, and maximum repetition rate.
Power and energy meters measure the output of an optical source. They are a necessity in a wide variety of applications in the lab, on the production floor, or in the field, whether the emission is from low-light sources, such as fluorescence, or from high-energy pulsed lasers.

No doubt that the need to accurately measure laser power and energy has increased as more of these systems are used in medical procedures and industrial processes.
Although a fairly simple process, this measurement is not as straightforward as an electric power measurement.
With lasers, more attention must be paid to the selection of the right sensor as different sensors perform different measurements.

Selecting the wrong sensor can result in inability to measure well or can even destroy the sensor.

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