Author Archives: OphirBlog

Laser measurement software from Ophir® can now measure laser power from anywhere! – Part 2

If you read our last blog post in the series, now you probably wondering – ‘How can I connect my EA-1 (Ophir’s Ethernet adopter) to StarLab laser measurement software?’
Well, not to worry – we’ve got that covered for you:
After completing the software installation, you are ready to connect the EA-1 device.

Ophir’s Ethernet adopter (EA-1) connects to StarLab via the Ethernet connection on your PC.

To connect the EA-1:
a. Click Select Device(s)
b. Verify that ‘Use Ethernet Devices’ is selected


c. Click to ‘Configure Ethernet Devices’ to open the search device dialog.
d. Select the device that is listed in the left panel and click ‘Add’ the button.
The selected device is entered the right panel.

Click the ‘O.k’ button.

The Select Device window updates with the selection.

 

 

 

 

 

For detailed instructions refer to the StarLab manual Ethernet adapter user manual.

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Ophir® is proud to share the MKS Semiconductor Devices and Process Technology handbook!

MKS presents the Semiconductor Devices and Process Technology handbook! This comprehensive 200+ page exhibits the fundamentals used to manufacture semiconductors. We want to share it with you, with the hope that you will find it informative and of some value to your work.

Download your free copy here.

 

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Product Focus: Using Ophir’S BC20 to Evaluate Scanned Effects in Light Show Applications

Music concerts, along with other entertainment venues such as nightclubs and theme parks, use laser sources to create colorful and vivid lighting effects.

Even with advances in non-coherent lighting, technology has not been able to replicate the unique appearance of laser lighting effects.

The types of lasers used for light show applications typically emit radiant powers in excess of 20W over a range of common wavelengths based on the technology employed in the projection device. Devices emitting such powers place them firmly into Class 4 laser product territory. How do laser officers deal with the challenge and what does Ophir have to offer? Coming up…

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How to choose the right sensor using the Ophir® Sensor Finder

Choosing the best laser sensor for a particular application can be quite overwhelming.
Ophir has so many sensors! Which is the best one for measuring your laser beam?
The choice actually depends on many parameters. The Ophir Sensor Finder does most of the thinking for you, and helps you choose the right sensor for your application. This video shows you how to use it:

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Technical Tip: How to select a power and energy meter – part 2

So, as we’ve started discussing the best way to pick a power meter last week, we’ve reached the third piece of data we need – and that is the laser wavelength. Why is it so important? In order to match it to the sensor absorber characteristics.

We need to select a sensor whose wavelength is within the measurement range of the sensor, power rating is equal to or higher than the maximum power we will measure, whose aperture is larger than the laser beam diameter so that it will contain the whole beam, and whose damage threshold is higher than the maximum expected laser power density at the given wavelength. The sensor absorber should be selected so it matches the wavelength for higher absorption.

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Technical Tip: How to select a power and energy meter – Part 1

Measuring optical power and energy depends on an understanding of the types of sensors and instruments available, and on requirements such as wavelength response, dynamic range, damage threshold, and maximum repetition rate.
Power and energy meters measure the output of an optical source. They are a necessity in a wide variety of applications in the lab, on the production floor, or in the field, whether the emission is from low-light sources, such as fluorescence, or from high-energy pulsed lasers.

No doubt that the need to accurately measure laser power and energy has increased as more of these systems are used in medical procedures and industrial processes.
Although a fairly simple process, this measurement is not as straightforward as an electric power measurement.
With lasers, more attention must be paid to the selection of the right sensor as different sensors perform different measurements.

Selecting the wrong sensor can result in inability to measure well or can even destroy the sensor.

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FluxGage™ LED Luminaire Test System: Setup and Use

Ophir’s new FluxGage LED Luminaire Test System helps you quickly and easily measure the critical performance parameters of your LED luminaires for optimum production process and quality control.
In this video we’ll see how to set up and use the FluxGage.

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The trick to measure your (pulsed laser) peak power

If you’re involved with pulsed lasers, doing research, system design, process control, final test, or field service, you are going to want to accurately measure your laser power.
The more you know about the measurement process, the better the results.
However, most pulsed laser power meters display the total energy of a pulse or alternatively the average power, not the peak power.

As an Ophir customer you have the ability to measure the peak power of a pulsed laser beam using Ophir laser measurement equipment.

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Measuring Laser Power Below the Noise Floor with a Lock-In Amplifier

Measuring optical signals in the femtowatt (10-15) to nanowatt (10-9) range can be very challenging. Signal levels this low are lost in typical detector noise levels and swamped by background light. The noise floor for photodiode detectors operated with a small bandwidth (~10 Hz) is on the order of 1 picowatt (10-12). Further narrowing of the bandwidth by filtering or averaging will only provide a small additional reduction in the noise level.

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High Power Industrial Laser Measurement: Overcoming Obstacles with the Helios Sensor

Measuring high power laser beams in a production environment comes along with several hurdles.  Here are some of the common issues that need to be addressed:

  • Water cooling
  • How to minimize laser down-time
  • How to keep the sensor clean
  • What kind of industrial communication interfaces to use
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